• About us

    About us

    Welcome to the East Northport Jewish Center. We are a Conservative, egalitarian synagogue of approximately 300 families. We are truly multi-generational; our youngest members are infants, our oldest are in their nineties. On any Shabbat, you can find three generations of the same family in our pews. Read More
  • Shabbat Across America

    Shabbat Across America

    On March 3, tens of thousands of Jews across North America will come together to eat, drink, relax, dance, enjoy, debate and celebrate at the 21st Annual Shabbat Across America and Canada. Please join us at 6:15 for this important annual celebration. Read More
  • Military Bridge

    Military Bridge

    Want to have a great time on a Saturday night? Join Sisterhood for Military Bridge! Read More
  • Happy Purim!

    Happy Purim!

    Head to the ENJC to hear "the whole Megillah"- the story of how the Jewish people were saved from Haman in the Book of Esther. Read More
  • March Tot Shabbat

    March Tot Shabbat

    Bring your young child or grandchild to share in the wonders of Shabbat. Our Tot service provides a warm and exciting experience the children truly enjoy. All participants must be accompanied by an adult. Read More
  • Men's Club - Sisterhood Shabbat

    Men's Club - Sisterhood Shabbat

    Come to the ENJC for a very special annual event, as members of Men's Club and Sisterhood participate in our Friday night services Read More
  • Buy a Brick

    Buy a Brick

    Honor or memorialize a loved one, commemorate a special event, mark your years of ENJC membership, give a lasting and meaningful gift. Your brick or bench will be a part of a beautiful new outdoor seating area, to be enjoyed by all our members and guests. You can place your order by clicking below. Read More
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Leadership

  • Ian Silverman, Rabbi
  • Eric Loring, ENJC President
  • Ralph P. Nussbaum, Cantor

rabbi10View current news articles, commentary, videos and more that have an impact on Jewish culture, politics and religion at Rabbi Silverman's Sites to See

Reflections on the beginning of Exodus and the UN Resolution 2334: Saving the world while saving one’s own

We will explore the world of push-and-pull in Moses’ inner psyche and in so doing, maybe see a reflection of ourselves.

Moses bursts onto the scene an internationalist, working on behalf of those who are oppressed. Brought up as an Egyptian royal, Moses looks upon slavery in the abstract and sees an oppressed people, but it takes a while before he actually internalizes that those who are abused are his own people and is bothered enough to spring into action. It says in Vayigdal Moshe, “…and Moses matured and then went out unto HIS people and saw their suffering.” The Midrash tells us that Moses sees an Egyptian raid a man’s home at night and takes the man and his wife out into the dark. The Egyptian approaches the wife, who cannot see in the dark, pretending to be her husband. Thereafter, with the Egyptian knowing that the man is onto him, this taskmaster torments the slave daily. Moses “looked here and there…he saw the man’s debasement in his own home and he saw his debasement during the day in the field, and he struck out at the Egyptian and in the process killed him…” But Moses still, at this point, has issues with being a savior only of his own people.

A bounty is put on Moses’ head and he flees to Midian. Seeing that working to help your own is dangerous and yet not able to refrain from helping others, he immediately goes to work aiding the daughters of Jethro, who are attempting to draw water for the flock they are tending, but are being tormented by local bullies. Moses defends them and draws their water. Jethro, thinking Moses an Egyptian, rewards Moses by giving him Tzippora to wed, and Moses fathers two children and stays in Midian as a shepherd. Moses is contented for forty years, fully one third of his life, ignoring his own people’s suffering while helping a different people and helpless animals. It only when happening upon God in the form of a strangely and perennially burning bush, that he is reminded of the oppression of the Hebrews in Egypt. We know of such people that will move mountains to help the oppressed of the world and poor animals suffering, but when it comes to their own people’s plight, they poo-poo it. And aren’t some of these people us? Moses, even after a forty-year hiatus, still drags his feet to the point where God almost kills him on the way back to Egypt!

Moses seems to need to go through that journey of re-sensitizing himself to his brothers’ suffering–vayetze el Echav vayaar sivlotam–to really see the suffering of his brothers, his sisters, and his own family in the main. Much like Abraham before him, he flirts with universalism and worries a lot about people suffering like those in Midian and in Sodom and Gemorrah. Abraham, in his day, overlooked the violence and the people’s incitement–the fact that they were almost all wicked– and struggled to have God save them too. That is a fine and deeply needed sensibility, to an extent. But in Abraham’s case, his focus became so much the inclusion of the wicked that he lost sight of the advocacy of his own. He seemed mute when God told him “Hey Abe, take Ishmael and his mother into the desert with a canteen of water…” He seemed frozen when God demanded, “Nu, slaughter your own son Isaac…” In other words, he loses his bearing and his right to self- preservation. So too, Moses at this point pawns off the job of rescuing those pesky “Israelites,” saying, “God, please I am slow of speech…” Send someone else, please–let me off the hook.

And of course we know this tension. It is difficult not to agree with those who claim we should care about the rights and suffering of so many groups. We should advocate equally for the oppressed groups of minorities and Muslims, of queer people and of illegals. We should be color blind and indiscriminate in embracing the liberation movements of all peoples. Consistency must be the order of the day. Like Moses and Abraham, the needs of those of Sodom and Gemorah and the needs of the Midianites and the needs of all oppressed should occupy our time equally.

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EricLoringIt is a new year, a time of new beginnings! I hope that everyone had a lovely Chanukkah. As everyone knows, Cantor Nussbaum is now retired. He and Avrille are making arrangements to move closer to their family in New Jersey. He is extremely appreciative of the love and support he has received.

A lot has been happening over the last couple of months, so I would like to give an update of where we stand. We have hired Eliza Zipper as Religious School principal. She is a graduate of the Davidson School at Jewish Theological Seminary and has many years of experience as a Jewish educator and youth leader. She brings a great deal of energy and excitement about Jewish education. We look forward to working with her.

Also in the Religious School, we have hired Rabbi David Shain as the Hay Prayer and Hebrew Skills teacher. Those of you who have spent time at Gurwin may be familiar with Rabbi Shain, who has served there as a mashgiach (kashrut supervisor) and their Shabbat Rabbi. Rabbi Shain is very personable and knowledgeable. I am confident that our Hay students are in good hands.

Turning our attention to B’nai Mitzvah preparation, we have hired Dr. Paul Kaplan, a former long-term congregant, to tutor our B’nai Mitzvah students. Dr. Kaplan is a retired college professor with decades of teaching experience. In addition, in his own words, he has prepared “a thousand students” for their Bar and Bat mitzvah including at least one member of our Board of Directors. We are lucky to have him on board.

Finally, the Cantor Search committee has been meeting regularly since mid-November. With input from the Board and committees, a job description for our Cantor position has been developed. We have submitted our job posting to the Cantor Assembly Placement Office and we have begun to receive applications. It is still very early in the process, but we are on course and schedule. Look for future updates as things develop.

Shalom, chaverim! See you in shul!

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nussbaum

Our dear Cantor Nussbaum has retired as of December 31, 2016. The past quarter century under Cantor Nussbaum represents a time of special friendship and spirituality with our congregation, its leadership, teachers and faculty, and the many students he has touched throughout the years. The East Northport Jewish Center wishes him, Avrille and their family all the best– a long and joyous retirement. We are profoundly grateful for the priviledge to have been enriched by his presence among us. 

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Services

  • This Week

Week of Monday, February 27

Monday – Thursday
Evening minyan – 8:15 pm

Friday, March 3
Evening Service – 7:30 pm
Shabbat Across America
Birthday Shabbat

Saturday, March 4
Shabbat Service – 8:45 am

Sunday, March 5
Morning minyan – 9:00 am
Evening minyan – 8:15 pm



 

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The ENJC Celebrates Chanukah 2016

Candlelighting

Contact Us

The East Northport Jewish Center
328 Elwood Road
East Northport, NY, 11731  

Phone: 631-368-6474
Fax: 631-266-2910
Religious School Office: 631-368-6474

Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Religious School: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

        

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