• About us

    About us

    Welcome to the East Northport Jewish Center. We are a Conservative, egalitarian synagogue of approximately 300 families. We are truly multi-generational; our youngest members are infants, our oldest are in their nineties. On any Shabbat, you can find three generations of the same family in our pews. Read More
  • Summer Blood Drive

    Summer Blood Drive

    With a critical blood shortage this summer, there is an urgent need for donors. Please share this lifesaving gift! Read More
  • BBQ Shabbat

    BBQ Shabbat

    Enjoy a summer food favorite in the waning days of summer, followed by a Shabbat under the stars! Read More
  • High Holiday Services

    High Holiday Services

    We invite you to join us for our 2018/5779 High Holiday Services Read More
  • Selichot 2018 at the ENJC

    Selichot 2018 at the ENJC

    Selichot begins the High Holiday season, with an emphasis on penitential prayers. Join us for a hilarious, searching and movie story of one man's quest for spiritual enlightenment. Read More
  • High Holiday Service Babysitting

    High Holiday Service Babysitting

    Your children are safe and secure in age-appropriate classrooms while you worship on the High Holidays Read More
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CantorMondrow

First and foremost, I would like to say how happy I am to be here at the East Northport Jewish Center. Everyone I have met thus far has gone out of their way to make me feel exceptionally welcome. Thank you.

I would like to take this opportunity to tell you a bit about myself. I’m born and raised in West Bloomfield, Michigan, a suburb of Detroit, and grew up at Congregation B’nai Moshe, a Conservative synagogue. From a young age, my relationship to Judaism has always been important to me. My father decided, when I was about 7, that we were going to go to shul each Shabbat. That experience solidified in me a ritual pattern that has stayed with me to this day. Following my Bar Mitzvah, I began working in our synagogue religious school, giving me my first taste of congregational life. I would continue working in religious school all the way through my collegiate career. In High School I was very active in chorus and theatre, and therefore, it was no surprise to my parents when I decided to apply to music programs for college. I settled on Kalamazoo College, a small 1200 student liberal arts school in Western Michigan. I was one of 4 music majors in my graduating class, and the only one without a double-major. While at Kalamazoo College I had the opportunity to explore, and through my first-year seminar professor, became very active in the autism community of Kalamazoo. To this day, I see that experience as an eye-opening event for me that solidified my way to the Cantorate, in that it fostered an appreciation for working with people. Following my graduation from Kalamazoo College, I attended the Jewish Theological Seminary of America to prepare for my Cantorial career. Following my investiture, I had the privilege to serve Temple Torah of West Boynton Beach, Florida, now Temple Torat Emet, in Boynton Beach, for 5 years. There, I took great pride in preparing B’nai Mitzvah students, seeing to the cultural programming of the synagogue through special shabbatot, and concert programming, which I hope to bring here to my new home in East Northport.

If there is anything I can assist you with on your own Jewish journey, I’m happy to provide support. Learning to read Torah, Haftorah, and Megillot, and leading services are just a few of the topics where I can help. I hope to meet many more of you in the coming holiday season. Thank you all again for the warm welcome.

Leadership

  • Ian Silverman, Rabbi
  • Eric Loring, ENJC President
  • The Fast Day in Tammuz

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View current news articles, commentary, videos and more that have an impact on Jewish culture, politics and religion at 
Rabbi Silverman's Sites to See

The Importance of Civility

It's always been a bit ironic that as we move into the more carefree summer months, in which we hope to relax and to live a life of leisure, that the Jewish calendar calls for us not to relax but to move into a three week period when we don't eat meat (except for Shabbat), and when we limit swimming, weddings and shaving. The three week period commences this year on July 1 and ends with Tisha B'Av July 21-22 (beginning after Shabbat). All this quasi-mourning-like behavior is due to the fact that we twice lost Jerusalem and the Holy Temples on this day. Our sages taught that we were exiled and destroyed, not because we were outmatched militarily, but also because we were weak inside. 

One of the people's flaws was that of sinat chinam, unwarranted hatred of our fellow man. The classic story is told of a host, Kamza, who was not ready to forget the dislike of his guest, Bar Kamza, even though the guest had come to Kamza's home thinking he was forgiven. The story's pathos is the missed opportunity of civility, forgiveness and friendship. In its place, the host humiliates the person who tried to build a relationship with him. Our sages compare the act of shaming another as the equivalent of shedding blood (murder), because humiliation drains the blood from the face or fills it with redness. Rabbi Shammai, a great rabbi, humiliated a potential convert by throwing him out of his Yeshiva when the convert challenged Rabbi Shammai to tell him about Judaism while standing on one foot. When the convert came to Rabbi Hillel with the same challenge, Rabbi Hillel responded, “That which is hateful to you, don't do to another, all the rest is commentary.” “Receive everyone with joyful countenance,” he says elsewhere. Anger and impatience get the best of even the greatest among us. Moses doesn't get into the Promised Land because of it and even God, at times, is held back and talked down by the righteous. Rabbi Meir once prayed for the death of sinners. “Pray instead,” says his wife, Bruria, “ for their repentance and change, and there will not be any sinners and wickedness will cease.” Rabbi Meir admits that his wife's solution is far better.

Another of the people's flaws was the way they spoke to and about one another. Lason Hara, or evil speech, is a grave sin, even if what we say is true. Motzi Shem Ra is badmouthing another. It's not even permitted to praise a person in front of someone who dislikes that person because it will often elicit words to the contrary! These laws are not easy to follow. All the more difficult is to hold one's tongue. Our sages tell us that we have one mouth and two ears, so that we can listen twice as much as we talk, and that we have teeth and lips to restrain our tongue from what we shouldn't say. There are even rules against rebuking another. It is an important mitzvah to call out another when they are doing something contrary the the Torah, but it should be done in private so as not to embarrass them. And if one knows that it will only entrench the bad behavior, it too, should be avoided.

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EricLoringIt is a new year, a time of new beginnings! I hope that everyone had a lovely Chanukkah. As everyone knows, Cantor Nussbaum is now retired. He and Avrille are making arrangements to move closer to their family in New Jersey. He is extremely appreciative of the love and support he has received.

A lot has been happening over the last couple of months, so I would like to give an update of where we stand. We have hired Eliza Zipper as Religious School principal. She is a graduate of the Davidson School at Jewish Theological Seminary and has many years of experience as a Jewish educator and youth leader. She brings a great deal of energy and excitement about Jewish education. We look forward to working with her.

Also in the Religious School, we have hired Rabbi David Shain as the Hay Prayer and Hebrew Skills teacher. Those of you who have spent time at Gurwin may be familiar with Rabbi Shain, who has served there as a mashgiach (kashrut supervisor) and their Shabbat Rabbi. Rabbi Shain is very personable and knowledgeable. I am confident that our Hay students are in good hands.

Turning our attention to B’nai Mitzvah preparation, we have hired Dr. Paul Kaplan, a former long-term congregant, to tutor our B’nai Mitzvah students. Dr. Kaplan is a retired college professor with decades of teaching experience. In addition, in his own words, he has prepared “a thousand students” for their Bar and Bat mitzvah including at least one member of our Board of Directors. We are lucky to have him on board.

Finally, the Cantor Search committee has been meeting regularly since mid-November. With input from the Board and committees, a job description for our Cantor position has been developed. We have submitted our job posting to the Cantor Assembly Placement Office and we have begun to receive applications. It is still very early in the process, but we are on course and schedule. Look for future updates as things develop.

Shalom, chaverim! See you in shul!

Read More

Musings About the Fast Day in Tammuz

Beginning on July 1, we enter into the period of Bein HaMeitzarim (between dire straits). We begin with a day of fast on the 17th of Tammuz, and we end on the night of Sunday, July 22 with Tisha B'Av. This year, we extend an extra day, due to Shabbat falling on the 9th of Av. This period of time, according to tradition, includes certain restrictions– in music listening, in eating meat (except Shabbat), swimming and purchasing new items, and the restrictions ramp up after the new month of Av begins (Should you be interested in these details, please contact Rabbi Ian). The day of fast, with no food or drink, begins with first light and ends with starlight, and is quite demanding because of the long days and heat of summer. Those who attempt to fast should stay in air conditioning and drink, if they feel their health at risk.

Here are some historical events that are associated with the 17th of Tammuz:

1. Moses broke the tablets when he saw the Jewish people worshipping the golden calf.

2. During the Babylonian siege of Jerusalem, the Jews were forced to cease offering the daily sacrifices, due to lack of sheep.

3. Apostomos, a Roman ruler, burned the Holy Torah.

4. An idol of Zeus was placed in the Holy Temple.

5. The walls of Jerusalem were breached by the Romans, in 69 CE, after a lengthy siege (Three weeks later, after the Jews put up a valiant struggle, the Romans destroyed the second Holy Temple on the 9th of Av). 

6. The Jerusalem Talmud maintains that this is also the date when the Babylonians breached the walls of Jerusalem and would, in three weeks time, finish destroying the first Temple.

It is interesting that the formative event at the time of Moses, was the smashing of the tablets upon seeing idolatry. Tradition tells us that the first Temple was made into rubble because of the same sin of idolatry. Anther midrashic legend connects the spies giving a bad report and convincing Israel of its inadequacy to the 9th of Av. One begins to think that certain days of the calendar have bad karma. But this cannot be in Judaism, because we know that all is in God's hands, except reverence and faith in Him, and if this is so, when we are penitent and pray and are charitable, we avert the evil decree. Thus, in Jewish belief, misfortune can be undone, but so much of that depends upon our choices and our mindset.

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Services

  • This Week

Week of Monday, July 16

Mon-Thurs, July 9-12
Weekly minyan – 8:15 pm

Friday, July 13
Shabbat Service– 7:30 pm

Saturday, July 14
Shabbat morning service – 8:45 am

Sunday, July 15
Morning minyan – 9:00 am
Evening minyan – 8:15 pm

 

 

HIGH HOLIDAY FORMS
Bima Flowers
Honey Baskets
Memorial Book
Milestones Booklet
Parking Raffle
Torah Fund

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Communities

  • 2018-2019 Congregation Board
  • Men's Club
  • Sisterhood
  • Youth
  • PJ Library
President Frank Brecher
Executive Vice President Richard Kessler
Building Administration Vice President Wendy Isaac
Community Relations Vice President Ilene Glatman
Fundraising Vice President Scott Keiser
House Administration Vice President Karen Tyll
Membership Vice President Linda Pollack
Ritual Vice President Ed Isaac
Youth Vice President Allan Berman
Education Vice President Brad Becker
Finance Vice President Brian Kain
Treasurer Michael Glatman
Co-Treasurer Carol Wasserman
Financial Secretary Gabe Weinstein
Corresponding Secretary Sue Kazzaz
Recording Secretary Robin Kain
Past President Eric Loring
Sisterhood President Anita Slade
Men's Club President Steve Krantz
   
  Evan Axelrod
  Sheri Davis
  Scott Feuer
  Jeff Glatzer
  Lori Graifman
  Rochelle Gull
Trustees Beth Krantz
  Howie Lewin
  Cheryl Mintz
  Leslie Salander
  Lori Scheuer
  Bryan Tropper
   
   
   
   

 

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The East Northport Jewish Center Men's Club is a social organization open to all male members of the synagogue. Its mission is to involve Jewish men in Jewish life and to promote friendship and comaraderie in that community by providing opportunities for socializing, networking and supporting synagogue activities.

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NewKrantz

2017-2018 Woman of Achievement Beth Krantz, with family and friends

The East Northport Jewish Center Sisterhood is an active arm of the synagogue, made up of a dynamic, vibrant group of women of all ages, who together work toward providing rich and varied programs of educational, cultural and social value for the congregation. Through these efforts, we reinforce our bond with Israel and Jews worldwide.

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USYGroup 18

The ENJC Youth Group's activities combine a wide variety of monthly events created for different age groups. Anyone looking for fun, friends, social or cultural events, community service or leadership opportunities will find them in our youth lounge.

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Families in hundreds of communities across the United States and Canada are exploring the timeless core values of Judaism through books and music. PJ Library is a Jewish Family Engagement program implemented on a local level throughout North America, which mails free, high quality Jewish children's literature and music to families on a monthly basis. If you are raising Jewish children from age six months through eight years, you are welcome to enroll.

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Final HiHi of the season-Wednesday, March 14

Candlelighting

Contact Us

The East Northport Jewish Center
328 Elwood Road
East Northport, NY, 11731  

Phone: 631-368-6474
Fax: 631-266-2910
Religious School Office: 631-368-6474

Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Religious School: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

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