• About us

    About us

    Welcome to the East Northport Jewish Center. We are a Conservative, egalitarian synagogue of approximately 300 families. We are truly multi-generational; our youngest members are infants, our oldest are in their nineties. On any Shabbat, you can find three generations of the same family in our pews. Read More
  • Adult Education, Fall 2017

    Adult Education, Fall 2017

    As in many religions, God intoxication and God manipulation get in the way and distort Judaism's basic core of humaneness. Join in the discussion as we grapple with Conservative Judaism in this light. Read More
  • Tot Shabbat

    Tot Shabbat

    Please join us for a joyful and musical Shabbat experience for families with children 2 - 8 years of age. Come together for song, dance, prayer, and stories. Older siblings welcome. This event is free of charge! Read More
  • The Forgotten Refugees film

    The Forgotten Refugees film

    The ENJC Israel Committee invites you to a light bite, a film and speakers on the topic of the history of Jewish communities of the Middle East and North Africa and their demise in the face of persecutions following the creation of the modern State of Israel in 1948 Read More
  • Election Day Blood Drive

    Election Day Blood Drive

    Donating Blood is a simple thing to do, but it can make a huge difference in the lives of others. Tuesday, November 7th, in the ENJC Ballroom, from 2:45 - 8:45 pm. Contact the ENJC office to reserve a time. Read More
  • Try Your Luck...

    Try Your Luck...

    Join us and enjoy munchies and beverages while playing Blackjack, Roulette, Craps and Poker with chances to win fabulous prizes. Bring your friends! Read More
  • Parents' Night Out

    Parents' Night Out

    Whether you want to get some Chanukah shopping done, or just have a night to yourselves, here's your opportunity! Your kids will be safe under the watchful eye of the Sisterhood, having fun with snacks, crafts, movies, games and much more! Read More
  • Buy a Brick

    Buy a Brick

    Honor or memorialize a loved one, commemorate a special event, mark your years of ENJC membership, give a lasting and meaningful gift. Your brick or bench will be a part of a beautiful new outdoor seating area, to be enjoyed by all our members and guests. You can place your order by clicking below. Read More
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • 6
  • 7
  • 8

EricLoringIt is a new year, a time of new beginnings! I hope that everyone had a lovely Chanukkah. As everyone knows, Cantor Nussbaum is now retired. He and Avrille are making arrangements to move closer to their family in New Jersey. He is extremely appreciative of the love and support he has received.

A lot has been happening over the last couple of months, so I would like to give an update of where we stand. We have hired Eliza Zipper as Religious School principal. She is a graduate of the Davidson School at Jewish Theological Seminary and has many years of experience as a Jewish educator and youth leader. She brings a great deal of energy and excitement about Jewish education. We look forward to working with her.

Also in the Religious School, we have hired Rabbi David Shain as the Hay Prayer and Hebrew Skills teacher. Those of you who have spent time at Gurwin may be familiar with Rabbi Shain, who has served there as a mashgiach (kashrut supervisor) and their Shabbat Rabbi. Rabbi Shain is very personable and knowledgeable. I am confident that our Hay students are in good hands.

Turning our attention to B’nai Mitzvah preparation, we have hired Dr. Paul Kaplan, a former long-term congregant, to tutor our B’nai Mitzvah students. Dr. Kaplan is a retired college professor with decades of teaching experience. In addition, in his own words, he has prepared “a thousand students” for their Bar and Bat mitzvah including at least one member of our Board of Directors. We are lucky to have him on board.

Finally, the Cantor Search committee has been meeting regularly since mid-November. With input from the Board and committees, a job description for our Cantor position has been developed. We have submitted our job posting to the Cantor Assembly Placement Office and we have begun to receive applications. It is still very early in the process, but we are on course and schedule. Look for future updates as things develop.

Shalom, chaverim! See you in shul!

Leadership

  • Ian Silverman, Rabbi
  • Zachary M. Mondrow, Cantor
  • Eric Loring, ENJC President

rabbi10View current news articles, commentary, videos and more that have an impact on Jewish culture, politics and religion at Rabbi Silverman's Sites to See

It is hard to envision Sukkoth on the other side of the High Holidays because of the monumental place of Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur in the American Jewish holiday cycle. I composed a sermon a couple of decades ago bemoaning the slow death of Highway 66, which holds an iconic place in the American imagination. The article rued the demise of the charming and distinctive locales now no longer encountered because of the interstate system. Little towns, motels and restaurants are bypassed by truckers, bikers and tourists as they make their way to the west coast. “Sometimes,” I wrote, “the holiday cycle is the same as the Jewish calendar. The interstate highways of Passover, Hanukah, Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur are travelled so well by so many, but the little locales of the other holidays in Judaism get such short shrift and are sadly victim to this infrastructure.”

But Sukkoth is an important holiday in its own right. Back in the time of the Bible, it was really important and even bigger than Passover as a pilgrimage holiday. In the Rabbinic literature it was called “HaHaG,” the quintessential holiday. It no longer has quite that turbo-charge today, although it is still a very big deal in Jerusalem. Sukkoth’s Kohain rite in the Kotel Plaza is like no other spiritual moment. Still, Sukkoth has many things going for it, running on multiple cylinders, and therefore I commend it. Here are some facts in honor of the seven days of Sukkoth:

  1. It is a holiday that has a direct connection to nature. The lulav and etrog carry with it the symbolism and the prayer for rain of climate and habitat.

  2. It is a holiday where we are provided tools to not only celebrate the Heavens but, in some way, sway them by our waving of the lulav and Etrog. Tradition tells us that we actually vitalize the seven lower sphirot potencies of God in our ritual.

  3. It is a holiday with an “outward bound program that thrusts us, albeit gently, into the wild to get a new perspective.

  4. It is an existential holiday that has us reflect on mortality; on our own life being a somewhat fragile hut subject to the ravages of time. We read from the book of Ecclesiastes, which ponders the verities and the vanities of earthly life and orients us to the spiritual.

  5. It is a social holiday with much entertaining of loved ones, friends and special “historic” guests in our sukkah.

  6. The sukkah is a time machine “blast into the past” which recalls Biblical tent dwellers and the ancient Temple of King David. It is also provides the spiritual “flux capacitor” to catapult us into the future, envisioning a messianic time.

  7. Sukkoth is a holiday that celebrates every kind of Jew- the studious, the loving, the uninitiated and the righteous. We hold all the species together to uniquely symbolize our strength in all contributing to the whole.

Sukkoth is the first “local” stop on the Jewish calendar year, off the beaten route of the interstate holidays. Get off at this exit and enjoy the color and vibrancy of this unique calendar moment. Help us celebrate it Yontif morning, October 5th and 6th and on Hoshana Rabbah morning, Wednesday, October 11 at 7 am. 

Read More

CantorMondrow

First and foremost, I would like to say how happy I am to be here at the East Northport Jewish Center. Everyone I have met thus far has gone out of their way to make me feel exceptionally welcome. Thank you.

I would like to take this opportunity to tell you a bit about myself. I’m born and raised in West Bloomfield, Michigan, a suburb of Detroit, and grew up at Congregation B’nai Moshe, a Conservative synagogue. From a young age, my relationship to Judaism has always been important to me. My father decided, when I was about 7, that we were going to go to shul each Shabbat. That experience solidified in me a ritual pattern that has stayed with me to this day. Following my Bar Mitzvah, I began working in our synagogue religious school, giving me my first taste of congregational life. I would continue working in religious school all the way through my collegiate career. In High School I was very active in chorus and theatre, and therefore, it was no surprise to my parents when I decided to apply to music programs for college. I settled on Kalamazoo College, a small 1200 student liberal arts school in Western Michigan. I was one of 4 music majors in my graduating class, and the only one without a double-major. While at Kalamazoo College I had the opportunity to explore, and through my first-year seminar professor, became very active in the autism community of Kalamazoo. To this day, I see that experience as an eye-opening event for me that solidified my way to the Cantorate, in that it fostered an appreciation for working with people. Following my graduation from Kalamazoo College, I attended the Jewish Theological Seminary of America to prepare for my Cantorial career. Following my investiture, I had the privilege to serve Temple Torah of West Boynton Beach, Florida, now Temple Torat Emet, in Boynton Beach, for 5 years. There, I took great pride in preparing B’nai Mitzvah students, seeing to the cultural programming of the synagogue through special shabbatot, and concert programming, which I hope to bring here to my new home in East Northport.

If there is anything I can assist you with on your own Jewish journey, I’m happy to provide support. Learning to read Torah, Haftorah, and Megillot, and leading services are just a few of the topics where I can help. I hope to meet many more of you in the coming holiday season. Thank you all again for the warm welcome.

Read More

EricLoringIt is a new year, a time of new beginnings! I hope that everyone had a lovely Chanukkah. As everyone knows, Cantor Nussbaum is now retired. He and Avrille are making arrangements to move closer to their family in New Jersey. He is extremely appreciative of the love and support he has received.

A lot has been happening over the last couple of months, so I would like to give an update of where we stand. We have hired Eliza Zipper as Religious School principal. She is a graduate of the Davidson School at Jewish Theological Seminary and has many years of experience as a Jewish educator and youth leader. She brings a great deal of energy and excitement about Jewish education. We look forward to working with her.

Also in the Religious School, we have hired Rabbi David Shain as the Hay Prayer and Hebrew Skills teacher. Those of you who have spent time at Gurwin may be familiar with Rabbi Shain, who has served there as a mashgiach (kashrut supervisor) and their Shabbat Rabbi. Rabbi Shain is very personable and knowledgeable. I am confident that our Hay students are in good hands.

Turning our attention to B’nai Mitzvah preparation, we have hired Dr. Paul Kaplan, a former long-term congregant, to tutor our B’nai Mitzvah students. Dr. Kaplan is a retired college professor with decades of teaching experience. In addition, in his own words, he has prepared “a thousand students” for their Bar and Bat mitzvah including at least one member of our Board of Directors. We are lucky to have him on board.

Finally, the Cantor Search committee has been meeting regularly since mid-November. With input from the Board and committees, a job description for our Cantor position has been developed. We have submitted our job posting to the Cantor Assembly Placement Office and we have begun to receive applications. It is still very early in the process, but we are on course and schedule. Look for future updates as things develop.

Shalom, chaverim! See you in shul!

Read More

Services

  • This Week

Week of Monday, October 16

Mon – Thurs, October 16-19
Weekday minyan – 8:15 pm

Friday, October 20
Evening Shabbat Service – 7:30 pm
Tot Shabbat – 6:30 pm

Saturday, October 21
Morning Shabbat Service – 8:45 am

Sunday, October 22
Morning minyan – 9:00 am
Evening minyan – 8:15 pm

 RNDPortButton4

Find us on

  




 

Read More

We Need YOU for a Minyan!

WENeedYouForAMinyan

 

USY Kickoff BBQ - Sunday, September 10

Candlelighting

Contact Us

The East Northport Jewish Center
328 Elwood Road
East Northport, NY, 11731  

Phone: 631-368-6474
Fax: 631-266-2910
Religious School Office: 631-368-6474

Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Religious School: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

CONGREGANT PORTAL

 

        

Upcoming Events

Donate to ENJC

USCJ logo horizontal Color 2 rev

healthcare jobs washington dc

levitra uk

atrium pharmacy

doxycycline online

harmony korine drugs

levaquin online

prescription medication for leg cramps

buy tetracycline online

pills for a bigger booty

buy azithromycin online

metanx prescription

viagra

priority health insurance

dapoxetine uk online

google android 2.2 tablet

phentermine 37.5 mg

i need a doctor song

adderall online without a prescription

water pill for high blood pressure

lorazepam online

naturopathic doctor schools

ostaa viagra